The Catholic University of America
 

Course Descriptions

Physics (PHYS)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

PHYS 101: 20th Century Physics I

3.00 Credits

A presentation using relatively little mathematics of basic physics as understood at the beginning of the 20th Century. Major advances in physical thought since 1900 are emphasized. Intended for non-concentrators.

PHYS 103: Astronomy

3.00 Credits

A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for nonconcentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

PHYS 104: Search of Extraterrestrial Life

3.00 Credits

Recent discoveries of planets around nearby stars and possible fossil evidence from Mars has changed science's perspective on extraterrestrial life. Course is aimed at nonscience majors; addresses topics such as the connection between life and the evolution of stars, the origin of the solar system, origins of life on earth, possibilities of life on neighboring planets and evidence for other solar systems, interstellar travel, UFOs.

PHYS 122: Sound & Light in Nature & Arts

3.00 Credits

Designed for nonscience concentrators interested in music, high fidelity, vision, color, and the physical aspects of the arts.

PHYS 177: Freshmen Seminar: The Atomic Age

3.00 Credits

Examines the scientific discoveries, the social and political developments, and the ethical problems during the fifty-year period leading up to the dropping of the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945.

PHYS 191: The Newtonian Revolution

3.00 Credits

For honors students; examines the changes that took place in mathematics, physics and astronomy from 1500 to 1700. Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton in the context of their departure from Greek and Medieval science. Social and philosophical consequences considered.

PHYS 192: The Einstein/Bohr Revolution

3.00 Credits

For honors students; examines the development of quantum mechanics and relativity. Studies the evolution of key concepts which arose out of the failures of classical physics. Planck, Einstein, Bohr, and their contemporaries discussed as scientific figures and as philosophical innovators.

PHYS 194: Space,Time, and Einstein's Theory of Relativity

3.00 Credits

Using only a bit of algebra and geometry, presents an elementary but thorough exposition of Einstein's theory. Introduces just enough elements of classical physics to focus on the startling implications of the theory regarding the nature of space and time. For honors students only.

PHYS 197: The Universe: The First 15 Billion Years

3.00 Credits

Examines how new ideas and results from particle physics, astronomy, geophysics, and biology point to a Universe that was unthinkable a decade ago. How has the physical Universe changed over the 15 billion years since the big bang? What are the conditions necessary for Life in the Universe? What factors lead to advanced life and intelligence? For honors students and physics majors with instructor's permission.

PHYS 199: Newton to Einstein & Beyond

3.00 Credits

For honors students and physics majors with instructor's permission. Discusses the evolution of our understanding of the universe from the classical Newtonian view to the quantum revolution inspired 100 years ago by Einstein and Bohr to the current "standard model". Prerequisite: Modest math-science sophistication.

PHYS 205: College Physics I

4.00 Credits

Mechanics, heat, and sound. Topics of interest to biology concentrators, premedical and computer science students.

PHYS 206: College Physics II

4.00 Credits

Electricity, magnetism, and light. Topics of interest to biology concentrators, pre-medical and computer science students. Prerequisite: 205 or equivalent.

PHYS 215: University Physics I

4.00 Credits

An intensive calculus-based course in mechanics, heat and sound. Although intended primarily for mathematics, science, and engineering students, open to all qualified students. Prerequisite or concurrent: MATH 122.

PHYS 216: University Physics II

4.00 Credits

An intensive calculus-based course in electricity, magnetism, and light. Intended for mathematics, science, and engineering students but open to all qualified students. Prerequisites: PHYS 215 & MATH 122

PHYS 225: Introductory Mechanics Laboratory

1.00 Credits

A laboratory course stressing concepts and measurement techniques for velocity, acceleration, friction, and momentum and energy conservation. Prerequisite or concurrent: 205 or 215.

PHYS 226: Introductory Electricity Laboratory

1.00 Credits

Measurement techniques for DC and AC currents and voltages. Prerequisite or concurrent: 206 or 216.

PHYS 240: Sun and Earth: Concepts & Connections

3.00 Credits

Life on Earth relies upon the warming rays and influence of the sun. Exploring this idea is the linchpin for the study of basic principles of physical science. Hands-on experiments, computer simulations, analysis of sun-earth data available on the internet, and seminar discussions are integrated into an inquiry-driven curriculum to illustrate modern effective methods for teaching elementary science. Intended for early childhood and elementary education majors.

PHYS 406: Introduction to Modern Physics

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 411: Mathematical Physics I

3.00 Credits

A selection of topics in applied mathematics of interest to scientists and engineers. Topics include vectors, matrices, complex numbers, variables and functions, Fourier series. Same as MATH 511. Prerequisite: MATH 222 or equivalent.

PHYS 412: Mathematical Physics II

3.00 Credits

A selection of topics in applied mathematics of interest to scientists and engineers. Topics include ordinary and partial differential equations, Fourier and Laplace transforms, and special functions. Same as MATH 512. Prerequisite: MATH 222 or equivalent.

PHYS 425: Thermodynamics & Statistical Physics

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 428: Optics

3.00 Credits

The electromagnetic wave nature of light is examined. Those aspects of physical optics pertinent to recent developments are treated. Prerequisites: PHYS 506 or equivalent; MATH 222.

PHYS 431: Quantum Theory I

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 432: Quantum Theory II

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 435: Analytical Mechanics

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 436: Electricity and Magnetism

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 437: Intermediate Nuclear Physics

3.00 Credits

Interaction of nuclear radiation with materials; nuclear detection techniques; measurements of nuclear properties; conserved quantities in strong and weak nuclear interactions; nuclear models; alpha, beta, and gamma decay; nuclear reactions. Prerequisite or concurrent: PHYS 532.

PHYS 440: Materials Science: Structure and Properties of Solids

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 441: Introduction to Nanotechnology and Device Characterization

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 443: Introduction to Astrophysics

3.00 Credits

An introduction to observational astrophysics, radiative transfer, and the universe. Emphasizes reduction of observational data, simple modelling of stars, the interstellar medium and extragalactic sources. Prerequisite: PHYS 506 or equivalent.

PHYS 451: Senior Seminar

0 Credits

Required of and open only to senior physics concentrators. This class is billed at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PHYS 452: Senior Seminar II

0 Credits

Required of and open only to senior physics concentrators. This class is billed at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PHYS 460: Data analysis tools & satellite instrumentation

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 462: Space Weather I: Solar Phys Lecture

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 465: Intermediate Solid State Physics

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 468: Introduction to Condensed Matter Physics

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 469: Introduction to Biophysics

3.00 Credits

The course covers concepts and techniques from experimental and theoretical physics useful in analyzing biological problems at the molecular, cellular, whole organism, and eco-system levels. The course is suitable for first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Pre-requisites: permission of instructor.

PHYS 475: Experimental Techniques and Modern Detectors

3.00 Credits

This is an experimental course designed to provide an introduction to experimental techniques, detector design, and evaluation of detector components of medical, nuclear, particle, and high energy physics. This course is suitable for first-year graduate and advanced undergraduate students

PHYS 492: Readings in Physics

3.00 Credits

Prerequisite: Permission of chair.

PHYS 493: Advanced Research Practice

3.00 Credits

Enables credit to be given for research work in either on- or off-campus laboratories. Report required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PHYS 494: Independent Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

PHYS 506: Introduction to Modern Physics

3.00 Credits

Presents the basic ideas of quantum theory, atomic and molecular spectra, special relativity, solid state, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 216 or equivalent.

PHYS 525: Thermodynamics & Statistical Physics

3.00 Credits

General prinicples of classical thermodynamics. Equilibrium conditions. Formal structure. Maxwell relations. Stability of thermodynamic systems. Classical thermodynamics and phenomenological description of first-order transitions and critical phenomena. Introduction to statistical physics principles, microcanonical and canonical distributions. Kinetic theory.

PHYS 531: Quantum Theory I

3.00 Credits

Origin of quantum theory, Schroedinger theory of wave mechanics in one dimension, time-independent perturbation theory, application to one electron atom. Prerequisites: PHYS 506; MATH 222.

PHYS 532: Quantum Theory II

3.00 Credits

Application of Schroedinger wave mechanics to single and multi-electron atoms. Angular momentum and spin; identical particles; time-dependent perturbation theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 531.

PHYS 534: Advanced Physical Laboratory

3.00 Credits

Intended for physics concentrators. May be taken in the junior or senior year.

PHYS 535: Analytical Mechanics

3.00 Credits

An intermediate course in particle dynamics. Prerequisites: PHYS 216; MATH 222.

PHYS 536: Electricity and Magnetism

3.00 Credits

An intermediate course in electromagnetic theory with stress on physical concepts. Prerequisites: PHYS 216; MATH 222.

PHYS 540: Materials Science: Structure and Properties of Solids

3.00 Credits

An immediate course in materials science for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics, chemistry and engineering. Topics include bonding, phase equilibria and properties of metals, ceramics and polymers.

PHYS 541: Introduction to Nanotechnology and Device Characterization

3.00 Credits

This is a lecture/experimental course designed to provide an introduction to nanotechnology, nanoscale device fabrication and associated characterization techniques. This should be suitable for first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

PHYS 562: Space Weather I: Solar Physics

3.00 Credits

This course will provide students with necessary background for carrying out research in space physics leading to space weather applications. We will cover the central physics concepts associated with space weather and introduce state-of-the-art models used to simulate the dynamic behavior of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric space plasma environments. The course will include student participation to operational space weather forecasting activities in collaboration with scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

PHYS 563: Space Weather II:Earth/Sun Interactions

3.00 Credits

The sun is the primary source of magnetic fields and plasma in the heliosphere. The supersonic solar wind drags the solar magnetic field into the interplanetary medium. This course deals with the physics of the this interplanetary medium and its coupling to the sun's inner corona. Theory, observations and measurement techniques are discussed.

PHYS 564: Space Weather III :Magnetospheric Physics

3.00 Credits

During periods of solar and solar wind activity, geomagnetic storms and substorms inject plasma into the Earth's radiation belts that can cause spacecraft missions to fail, enhance auroral precipitation on the edges of the polar cap, and drive intense ionospheric currents that can disrupt electric transmission and cause power blackouts. The course will provide an understanding for the physics underlying these phenomena. Although PHYS 562 and PHYS 563 (Space Weather I and II) are highly recommended, they are not prerequisites.

PHYS 565: Intermediate Solid State Physics

3.00 Credits

Crystalline structure, thermal, electric, and magnetic properties of solids. Electron theory of metals and semiconductors; band theory, low temperature phenomena.

PHYS 568: Introduction to Condensed Matter Physics

3.00 Credits

The course covers concepts of condensed matter physics like electronic states in crystals, liquid crystals, phase transitions, defects, dynamic modes and ordering kinetics. The course is suitable for first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Pre-requisites: permission of instructor.

PHYS 591: Solar Data Analysis

1.00 Credits

This course is intended to provide an overview of data formats and data analysis useful for solar and space physics students. Particular emphasis will be placed on the structure and analysis of data from imaging instruments. The topics covered in this course will be illustrated by the analysis of data obtained by instruments flown on various spacecraft.

PHYS 611: Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics I

3.00 Credits

Linear vector spaces and matrix algebra. Vector and tensor analysis and curvilinear coordinates. Functions of complex variables, power series, calculus of residues. Linear second-order ordinary differential equations and their power series solutions at isolated singularities. Special functions (gamma, hypergeometric, Legendre, Bessel, elliptic).

PHYS 612: Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics II

3.00 Credits

Fourier series. Fourier, Laplace and other integral transforms. Partial differential equations (PDE) and boundary-value problems. First-order PDE in two independent variable, linear second-order PDE in two and three independent variables. Generalized functions and distributions. Integral representations and Green's functions. Applications to Laplace, Poisson, diffusion and wave equations.

PHYS 613: Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics

3.00 Credits

Differentiable manifolds and tensors. Lie derivatives and groups. Differential forms. Exterior differential and integral calculus. Connections for Riemannian manifolds and gauge theories. Physical applications.

PHYS 614: Group Theory

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 615: Advanced Mechanics I

4.00 Credits

Lagrangian and variational principles. Central force problem. Rigid body motion. Small oscillations. Hamiltonian mechanics and Poisson brackets.

PHYS 616: Advanced Mechanics II

3.00 Credits

Canonical transformations. Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Action-angle variables. Canonical perturbation theory. Relativistic kinematics.

PHYS 618: Nonlinear & Chaotic Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Dynamical systems, chaotic behavior, attractors. Maps and Poincare sections. Strange attractors and fractal dimensions. Lyapunov exponents, entropies. Measures of chaos, algorithmic complexity. Bifurcations, universality. Quasiperiodicity. Chaos in Hamiltonian systems. Introduction to quantum chaos.

PHYS 621: Statistical Mechanics I

4.00 Credits

Statistical basis of thermodynamics. Ensemble theory. Liouville and Poincare' Theorems. Microcanonical, Canonical and Grand-Canonical ensembles. Gibbs paradox and particle indistinguishability. Ideal gases treated with Classical and Quantum statistics and ensembles. Simple gases of atoms and molecules in the classical limit. Kinetic theory. Analysis of the H-Theorem, irreversibility and recurrence.

PHYS 622: Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics II

4.00 Credits

Ideal Bose systems and condensates. Black-body radiation. Field of sound waves, liquid helium II. Ideal Fermi systems. Electron gas. Pauli paramagnetism, Landau diamagnetism. Thermionic and photoelectric emissions. White dwarfs and neutron stars. Thomas- Fermi model. Interacting systems and Ising model. Phase transitions and critical phenomena. Fluctuations.

PHYS 623: Advanced Electromagnetic Theory I

4.00 Credits

Electrostatics and boundary value problems. Green's functions and potential theory. Legendre and Bessel functions. Multipole expansions and dielectric media. Magnetostatics. Faraday's law of induction. Maxwell's equations, electrodynamic potentials, and conservation laws (Poynting's theorem).

PHYS 624: Advanced Electromagnetic Theory II

4.00 Credits

Electromagnetic waves and their propagation, reflection and refraction properties. Waveguides. Electromagnetic radiation and radiating systems. Special theory of relativity. Lorentz transformations of electromagnetic 4-currents, 4-potentials and fields. Covariant forms of Maxwell equations. Relativistic dynamics of particles and electromagnetic fields. Radiation by moving charges. Lienard-Wiechert potentials.

PHYS 625: Stellar Astrophysics & Space Astronomy

3.00 Credits

Basic stellar properties, thermonuclear energy sources, evolution, opacity, and radiative transfer. Presented in view of recent results from spaceborne observations. Prerequisite: 543 or permission of instructor.

PHYS 626: Astrophysics L-D Plasmas

3.00 Credits

The physics of dust, atomic and molecular radiative and collisional processes, thermal balance shocks, relevant to low-density plasma. Applications to multicomponent nature of interstellar medium, both cool, dense and ionized nebulae, to hot interstellar and intracluster gas, and to environments of active galactic nuclei. Prerequisite: 543 or permission of instructor.

PHYS 628: Space Plasma Physics

3.00 Credits

The course is intended to provide students with the necessary background for carrying out research in space physics and space weather. We will introduce the basic concepts in kinetic, fluid and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasmas and the properties of the waves that can propagate in these media. We will cover the basics of discontinuities such as shocks, transport and acceleration of charged particles, MHD instabilities and fundamental principles of magnetic reconnection. Although mathematical treatment will be given for the selected topics, the emphasize will be on an intuitive understanding of the major aspects of space plasma physics. Applications will be made to solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric physics.

PHYS 635: Nuclear Physics

3.00 Credits

Interaction of nuclear radiation with materials; nuclear detection techniques; measurements of nuclear properties; conserved quantities in strong and weak nuclear interactions; nuclear models; alpha, beta, and gamma decay; nuclear reactions. Pre- or co-requisite: 532.

PHYS 636: Introduction to High-and Medium-Energy Physics

3.00 Credits

Pion-nucleon scattering, multipole expansion, K-mesons and CP invariance, electron-nucleus scattering, helicity formalism, form factors, parton distributions, quarks.

PHYS 641: Nanotechnology

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Nanoscale fabrication. photo- and Ebeam lithography. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy. Synthesis of nanoparticles and nanowires. Nanofluidics and advanced sensors. Micro- and nano-electromechanical systems. The course includes lecture and experimental sessions.

PHYS 644: Computational Physics

3.00 Credits

Introduces students to the process of approaching physics from a computational viewpoint, complementary to the traditional experimental and theoretical approaches to physics: the physics must be understood and described in mathematical terms which can be manipulated so that computational techniques can be applied to obtain a numerical solution, which must then be given a physical interpretation. Examines Monte Carlo simulations and a variety of numerical methods of general utility in physics. Assumes a working knowledge of FORTRAN and/or C/C++.

PHYS 645: Topics in Astrophysics I

3.00 Credits

A course that explores current research areas in astrophysics and physical cosmology.

PHYS 646: Topics in Astrophysics II

3.00 Credits

A course that explores current research areas in astrophysics and physical cosmology.

PHYS 649: Introduction to General Relativity

3.00 Credits

General Relatively is a theory of a class of physical phenomena encompassed by the term gravity. The purpose of this course is to acquaint graduate students with the concepts and the mathematical apparatus underlying the theory, at a level where they would be capable of carrying out calculations to solve problems ranging from very simple to moderately difficult. However, this is emphatically not a mathematical physics course, and thus its focus will be constantly maintained on the physical interpretation of the intervening equations and their solutions, as well on the phenomenology to be described by the theory.

PHYS 651: Elements of Statistics and Probability

3.00 Credits

Laws of probability, random variables. Probability distributions, moments, generating functions. Binomial, Poisson, normal and other fundamental distributions. Sampling distributions (chi-squared, student-t, Fisher-F). Tests of significance, confidence intervals. Statistical inference. Bayesian methods. Decision theory. Point estimation, maximum likelihood. Correlation and regression (simple and multiple).

PHYS 652: Analysis of Experimental Error

3.00 Credits

Systematic and statistical uncertainties. Correlation, combination and propagation of errors. Minimum covariance determinant estimation. Least squares and maximum likelihood fitting. Conditioning of fitting parameters. Tests of significance and reliability. Computing of confidence levels. Fitting of Monte Carlo fractions to data histograms. Error interpretation of minimization algorithms. The course includes analyses of sample data using computational techniques. A working knowledge of FORTRAN and/or C/C++ is assumed.

PHYS 659: Advanced Quantum Theory I

4.00 Credits

Theoretical and mathematical formulation of Quantum Mechanics. Transformations of states and observables, equations of motion, symmetries and conservation laws. Coordinate and momentum representations. Basic applications of wave-mechanics, Schroedinger equation and uncertainty principle. Harmonic oscillator. Theory of angular momentum and rotation group. Formation of bound states. Hydrogen atom.

PHYS 660: Advanced Quantum Theory II

4.00 Credits

Approximate methods: perturbation theory, variational method, time-dependent phenomena. Classical limit. Charged particle in a magnetic field. Scattering. Discrete symmetries. Identical particles. State preparation and determination. Measurement and interpretation of states. Bell's theorem. Basics of relativistic quantum mechanics: Dirac and Klein-Gordon Equations.

PHYS 662: Quantum Theory: Many Particle Systems

3.00 Credits

Nonrelativistic second quantization, Green's functions and field theory. Feynman and Goldstone diagrams. Linear response and collective modes. Fermi and Bose systems. Field theory and systems at finite temperature. Applications to superconductivity, superfluidity, and nuclear matter.

PHYS 665: Solid State Physics I

3.00 Credits

Crystalline structure, thermal electric, and magnetic properties of solids. Electron theory of metals and semiconductors; band theory, low temperature phenomena.

PHYS 666: Solid State Physics II

3.00 Credits

Defects and impurities. Excitons, polarons, magnons and polaritons. Magnetic materials, interactions and ordering. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous semiconductors, junctions and devices. Superconductivity. Giant and colossal magnetoresistance. Electronic and thermal processes in nanostructures. Surface effects.

PHYS 667: Physics of Nanoscale Devices

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 669: Biophysics

3.00 Credits

This course covers concepts and techniques from experimental and theoretical physics useful in analyzing biological problems at the molecular, cellular, whole organism, and eco-system levels. Topics include statistical mechanics of polymers, membranes, and other flexible objects, basics of low-Reynolds number fluid dynamics, physics of complex fluids - equilibrium and dynamics, single molecule fluorescence and micromechanical techniques - theory and experiments, elastic response of cells to mechanical perturbations, mechanics of bird and insect flight, and evolutionary dynamics. Pre-requisites: permission of instructor.

PHYS 675: Experimental Techniques and Modern Detector Characterization

3.00 Credits

This is an experimental course designed to provide an introduction to experimental techniques, detector design, and evaluation of detector components of medical, nuclear, particle, and high energy physics. This course is suitable for first-year graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

PHYS 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

Faculty. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PHYS 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

PHYS 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PHYS 750: Theory of Relativity

3.00 Credits

Review of special relativity and tensor analysis. Preface to curvature, equivalence principle. Riemannian manifolds, covariant differentiation. Parallel transport, geodesics. Riemann, Ricci and Einstein tensors. Einstein field equations. Schwarzschild geometry and black holes.

PHYS 751: Gravitation and Cosmology

3.00 Credits

Perfect fluids in special and general relativity. Spherical solutions of Einstein equations for stars. Realistic stars and gravitational collapse. Gravitational radiation. Cosmological models. Inflation.

PHYS 761: Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I

3.00 Credits

Quantization of the electromagnetic field. Lagrangian field theory. Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. Second quantization. Quantum electrodynamics and Feynman diagrams. QED processes in lowest order.

PHYS 762: Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II

3.00 Credits

Radiative corrections, regularization and renormalization. Path integrals. Weak interactions. Gauge theories, spontaneous symmetry breaking, electro-weak unification. Quantum chromodynamics and Standard Model.

PHYS 777: Graduate Research Seminar I

1.00 Credits

Stresses the techniques for solving problems in physics that transcend the traditional bounds of a single course. Emphasis on improving student teaching and oral presentation abilities. 777 emphasizes classical physics; 778 includes topics in modern physics.

PHYS 778: Graduate Research Seminar II

1.00 Credits

Stresses the techniques for solving problems in physics that transcend the traditional bounds of a single course. Emphasis on improving student teaching and oral presentation abilities. 777 emphasizes classical physics; 778 includes topics in modern physics.

PHYS 781: Physics of Glass

3.00 Credits

Oxide, metallic and chalcogenide glasses. Ionic and electronic processes in noncrystalline materials. Anderson localization in disordered media. Theory of small polaron transport in disordered materials. Theory of variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in glasses. Optical processes in disordered media. Linear and nonlinear irreversible thermodynamics covering fluctuation theory, Onsager theorem correlation functions in space and time, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, and the Kramers-Kronig theorem. Review of examples pertaining to glasses.

PHYS 782: Physics of Simple Liquids

3.00 Credits

An examination of the equilibrium, transport and dynamic properties of monatomic and simple polyatomic liquids. Examines experimental and molecular dynamics simulation results in terms of the existing theoretical framework and models of the liquid state. Prerequisite: 525.

PHYS 785: Department Colloquium

1.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 786: Department Colloquium

1.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 787: Seminar-Nuclear Physics

1.00 Credits

Seminar to review topics and current research in the field of Nuclear Physics. Instructor Consent Required.

PHYS 789: Seminar - Nanoscale Devices

2.00 Credits

With the advent of nanotechnology, quantum physics has expanded beyond the study of "fundamental" systems into the realm of device engineering. The design, fabrication and performance analysis of nanodevices rests squarely upon quantum mechanical concepts and calculations. The am of the course is to expose students to the concepts, techniques and phenomena linked with the development of this new technology. The level of the course is such as to benefit graduate students who are conducting, or planning to conduct, research on such topics or in related areas.

PHYS 797: Seminar in Astrophysics I

1.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 798: Seminar in Astrophysics II

1.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 992: Advanced Readings in Physics

3.00 Credits

Prerequisite: Permission of chair.

PHYS 993: Independent Research

3.00 Credits

Prerequisite: Permission of chair.

PHYS 994: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

PHYS 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

All graduate students working on dissertations in physics must register for dissertation guidance. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

PHYS 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

PHYS 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.